Author Topic: "Nolan Inside" & Arena as a reference  (Read 4451 times)

Offline SwissCow

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"Nolan Inside" & Arena as a reference
« on: Thu, 2005-01-27, 07:59:12 »
I've gone through some critics of Pepper's Ghost, most of them being dang good ! (All between 8/10 and 9/10). One of the prog rock site would offen use the terminology of "Nolan Inside" as soon as a band or a solo project would produce anything good, and Clive is involved in it. This referring to the obvious "Intel Inside" thing, I was wonderring how Clive thought about the analogy : it looks like your sole presence in any project is kind of a reference, a mark of good quality. Does it shock you, bother you, please you to be considered so ? What about the analogy with Intel ? :)

The same critics often talk about Arena as being THE reference of today's neo-progressive rock. Do you see things the same way ?

Bye !

Offline Moonloop

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Re: "Nolan Inside" & Arena as a reference
« Reply #1 on: Thu, 2005-01-27, 09:03:25 »
Interesting question SC.

Personally I don't see Arena as a neo-prog act anymore, certainly for the first two albums, but not since. I see them more as a keyboard-based melodic rock act these days. (don't like putting labals on bands anyway other than for reference purposes but you know what I meanĀ  :) )

Wonder how exactly the band would describe themselves ???

The brainwashed do not know that they are brainwashed...

Offline Clive

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Re: "Nolan Inside" & Arena as a reference
« Reply #2 on: Thu, 2005-01-27, 09:36:30 »
Personally I have always hoped that Arena would rise far enough to create its own identity. We may well be part of the 'prog' genre or the 'symphonic rock' movement or whatever the chosen pigeon hole may be, but mostly we are just 'Arena'!  :)
I think that is why certain bands survive better than others... the Marillions and IQs and Pendragons have all managed to become identifiable by their own names, they don't need the words 'prog rock' (or whatever) pinned after them.

As far as 'Nolan Inside'... I've never seen this reference, so I'm not really sure of the context. If people associate that with something good, then I'm quite happy.... if not... well, I'll just keep trying.... ;)

Offline SwissCow

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Re: "Nolan Inside" & Arena as a reference
« Reply #3 on: Thu, 2005-01-27, 20:43:14 »
Thanks Clive for your kind answer. It's nice to be in direct contact with you for such matter !

Bye !

PS: The "Nolan Inside" thing was always used to kind of remind the listener who's behind the keys, and what kind of music can be expected. The expression can be found in the following text for example (sorry, it's in french : http://www.progressivewaves.com/FrmChronique.aspx?ALB_ID=61 )

Offline jeffMc

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Re: "Nolan Inside" & Arena as a reference
« Reply #4 on: Wed, 2005-02-23, 02:25:33 »
Personally I have always hoped that Arena would rise far enough to create its own identity. We may well be part of the 'prog' genre or the 'symphonic rock' movement or whatever the chosen pigeon hole may be, but mostly we are just 'Arena'!  :)
I think that is why certain bands survive better than others... the Marillions and IQs and Pendragons have all managed to become identifiable by their own names, they don't need the words 'prog rock' (or whatever) pinned after them.

As far as 'Nolan Inside'... I've never seen this reference, so I'm not really sure of the context. If people associate that with something good, then I'm quite happy.... if not... well, I'll just keep trying.... ;)

Personally, I do not consider Arena prog rock, but it is progressive in that each time there is something new and interesting to listen to. ANd the music is not technical. It is approachable, but not pedestrian. Each album is an advancement. I think this is what makes Arena stand out. It is what attracts me to keep buying albums. I do not want to sit there and hear the same 'tron riff I heard in 1972. For example, when Butterfly Man came out, I was like, wow, that is how new music should be. Bedlam Fayre is another example of a tune that is new and fresh. New ideas. I do not mean to leave out others, they are all great. Arena evolves. They have their own sound. Distinct. Yes, progressive, but not prog rock. For example, and I still think this, Skin Game rocks! But the Shattered Room also rocks, in its own way (BTW-- I detected a bit of Shadowlandness in that one). Ok I will stop rambling.... All I can say to Arena is keep it going. you provide entertaining, interesting, approchable music, that is totally unique. Can't ask for more!

Offline Moonloop

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Re: "Nolan Inside" & Arena as a reference
« Reply #5 on: Wed, 2005-02-23, 16:32:44 »
Agreed Jeff. The problem with the 'prog' tag is that as soon as it's mentioned, people tend to assume a generic, forulaic third rate Genesis/Yes/ELP clone type band..!! The reality (as we all know) couldn't be further away.

The difference between (say) Radiohead and (certainly the latest) Pineapple Thief album is minimal yet one is globally massive whilst the other is (virtually) unknown. A very sad state of affairs  :(



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Offline jeffMc

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Re: "Nolan Inside" & Arena as a reference
« Reply #6 on: Wed, 2005-02-23, 17:09:07 »
Agreed Jeff. The problem with the 'prog' tag is that as soon as it's mentioned, people tend to assume a generic, forulaic third rate Genesis/Yes/ELP clone type band..!! The reality (as we all know) couldn't be further away.

The difference between (say) Radiohead and (certainly the latest) Pineapple Thief album is minimal yet one is globally massive whilst the other is (virtually) unknown. A very sad state of affairs  :(





Agreed, and for what it's worth, when Arena first came out, everyone said they were a Marillion clone. I just didn't see it. I know Mick was the link, but other than that, Arena was doing stuff, IMHO, a lot different. Maybe why I latched onto it, and have been an evangelist in the pacific northwest for Arena. (I credit Clive as to influencing some of the sound I do, when I do progressive ambient music). Alot of the grunge lovers here, actually took a liking to Arena when I have introduced them to the music. It is good, no great, music. Or as it was once said, it has structure. Having been a fan of classical music for all my life, Arena has the elements of structure, but enjoyable, because it is not a mathematical exercise.