Author Topic: Yes  (Read 15499 times)

Offline PH

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Yes
« on: Sat, 2008-04-12, 20:37:31 »
As far as I know there's no Yes topic yet.
Since Yes is one of the great prog bands, I'd really like to know something about them.
It would be a shame to die and not having heard a Yes album. (Same goes for any of the prog dinos)

My questions to you:

1. Do you like Yes?
2. What's so good/bad about them?
3. What do they sound like? Give some info about them please.
4. Which studio albums are the best?
5. Which studio albums are the worst?

Just tell something about them. Anything you want.

-Paco

Offline Deenfan

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Re: Yes
« Reply #1 on: Sun, 2008-04-13, 13:41:38 »
1. Do you like Yes?

A bit

2. What's so good/bad about them?

Nothing is bad, really. But then again, nothing ever seemed to grab hold, either.

3. What do they sound like? Give some info about them please.

I believe that depends on the album. A fine high-pitched but gentle singer, some good melodies and lots of weird prog stuff of variable levels of entertainment value

4. Which studio albums are the best?

Almost all bands that existed in the 80's released their best (that is, most sensible and melodic) releases at that time. Look for albums from this decade for the most song-based material. Example: "90125"

5. Which studio albums are the worst?

I will stretch the term "worst" to encompass "least accessible". I don't know if they ever released a crap album, but I think you'll find the greatest examples of juvenile prog insanity (charming or not) on their releases from the 70's. What ever the release year, "Tales from Topographic Oceans" is full of idiocy or brilliance, based on what your preferences are.

Offline Iggy

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Re: Yes
« Reply #2 on: Sun, 2008-04-13, 14:43:52 »
As far as I know there's no Yes topic yet.
Since Yes is one of the great prog bands, I'd really like to know something about them.
It would be a shame to die and not having heard a Yes album. (Same goes for any of the prog dinos)

My questions to you:

1. Do you like Yes?

Yes

2. What's so good/bad about them?

They are fantastic musicians in their own right.


3. What do they sound like? Give some info about them please.

Depending on the decade very diffferent.

seventies was my favorite

4. Which studio albums are the best?

Subjective but Close to the Edge is a fantastic album. Going for the One is also a fantastic album with Awaken being the highlight.

5. Which studio albums are the worst?

After seeing them live on numerous occasions over the last 30 years they are better live than in the studio. Best worst is very subjective the album I play the least is open your eyes.

Just tell something about them. Anything you want.

They don't seem to be great friends but seem bound together by the music. Rick Wakeman has joined and left 4 or 5 times.

-Paco

Offline maddox

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Re: Yes
« Reply #3 on: Sun, 2008-04-13, 16:18:25 »
1. Do you like Yes?

Yes and no. I kind of have a love/hate relationship with Yes.
I have to be in the 'mood' for them.  ;)

2. What's so good/bad about them?

Well for starters: Jon Anderson.  :-\
I really don't like the sound of his voice.  :-\
Music wise that is.  ;)
And i don't like the guitarsound of Steve Howe. Must say that how he plays is brilliant but i don't like his fushionistic approach.

3. What do they sound like? Give some info about them please.

I agree with Iggy, depends on what decade you choose.
Seventies was really old fashioned prog, eighties was a poppy kind of prog, the nineties gave us something in between and last years i haven't paid them much attention so i really can't tell.

4. Which studio albums are the best?

Close To The Edge is very good and i like the eighties-albums like 90125 and Big Generator and Talk. The latter was released in the nineties by the way.

5. Which studio albums are the worst?

Can't really tell since i don't have all their albums but i didn't like Re-union at all.

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Offline Nicky007

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Re: Yes
« Reply #4 on: Sun, 2008-04-13, 18:45:47 »
Paco, Yes were my fave group some four years ago, and one of my faves thirty years ago, so I've listened lots to them.


1. Do you like Yes?

You bet your a*  *horns*


2. What's so good/bad about them?

Great musicians. Particularly their leader Jon is Genius.

They are genuine musicians, living for their music. They rarely did anything for money, except somewhat 90125, as they were tired of being neglected and were in a crises, and very much Open Your Eyes, which seems uninspired to me.

They were always on the move, trying out all sorts of weird and arcane things. Therefore their music is very variable, some of it rocks like crazy, and some noodles you out'o your mind.

They were avid readers, particularly of religious literature. Jon was always trying out newly found ideas in the lyrics. Great stuff, try to follow his tracks.

On top of it, they were vegetarians - particularly Jon, of course - except for Rick, and that was one of the things they were constantly arguing about with him. Also Rick's solo career took off around Topographic, and he left Yes. Fortunately he returned for Going, cause he was the only true Yes keyboardist.


3. What do they sound like? Give some info about them please.

The question is more: What have Yes not tried out? I can barely think of any group that has sooo much variation in their music. Almost the only thing that made them recognisable was Jon's very special high-pitched spiritual voice.

But OK, let's try to characterise some Yes styles:  There's the very tender melodious style, usually Jon's contribution. There's the wild jazzy stuff, very much Steve's and Rick's ideas. Then there's the ethereal and ebullient mood carried by Rick. And then you have Chris going bananas with his bass now and then.


4. Which studio albums are the best?

In retrospect, my list would be:

1. Going For The One - musically, lyrically, and spiritually, one of their great masterpieces, and highly original at the time.
2. The Ladder - ditto, except not quite as original 22 years later.
3. Tormato - style like Going (recorded a year later).

If you ask me (and you did ask for it, Paco), the pre-Going albums are mainly of historical interest today. The best in them is Jon's wonderful songs. The extensive noodling has been surpassed by far by people like Masters JP and Steve Vai, who are more exciting and also don't go on forever.

All of the post-Going albums are great, except the aforementioned Open Your Eyes. Even the most troublesome Union has some moments of great melody, tenderness, and rhythm, also a true Yes-album.

It may sound surprising, but I'v never listened to Drama. Maybe I should some day, but for me, earlier, it simply couldnt be Yes without Jon. He's one of my great heros !

I havent either listened to their debut album Yes. It's from before Steve got into the mix, and nobody seems to like it.


5. Which studio albums are the worst?

Look above.

Nicky.
« Last Edit: Sun, 2008-04-13, 19:02:47 by Nicky007 »
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Offline keyboardistmatt

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Re: Yes
« Reply #5 on: Sun, 2008-04-13, 19:17:54 »
Yes sound like: Jon Anderson, Rick Wakeman, and Alan White meets Steve Howe and Chris Squire on a sunny afternoon. ;D
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Offline PH

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Re: Yes
« Reply #6 on: Sun, 2008-04-13, 22:16:51 »
Thanks all of you! That was very helpful.
Except maybe KBM... ;)

Hey, keep 'em coming!

-Paco

Offline Iggy

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Re: Yes
« Reply #7 on: Sat, 2008-06-28, 17:49:06 »

If you ask me (and you did ask for it, Paco), the pre-Going albums are mainly of historical interest today. The best in them is Jon's wonderful songs. The extensive noodling has been surpassed by far by people like Masters JP and Steve Vai, who are more exciting and also don't go on forever.

All of the post-Going albums are great, except the aforementioned Open Your Eyes. Even the most troublesome Union has some moments of great melody, tenderness, and rhythm, also a true Yes-album.


I missed this bit Nicky

I can't believe you have consigned Fragile, The Yes Album and Close to the edge into historical interest  >:(

Methinks you need to watch the Symphonic Yes DVD

atb
Iggy

Offline Crazy Diamond

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Re: Yes
« Reply #8 on: Mon, 2008-06-30, 23:37:20 »

It may sound surprising, but I'v never listened to Drama. Maybe I should some day, but for me, earlier, it simply couldnt be Yes without Jon. He's one of my great heros !

Nicky.


Nicky,

you should really try to give Drama a chance. Agreed, Jon Anderson will always epitomise Yes but Drama is a good album in it's own right - I really think they could have gone on with this line-up and produced some excellent work but I guess it was never going to be easy for Trevor Horn to replace Jon.....

 

Offline Nicky007

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Re: Yes
« Reply #9 on: Mon, 2008-06-30, 23:58:22 »
... you should really try to give Drama a chance ...

OK, Andy, now I'm ready to hear Yes with another singer than Jon. I've actually wondered a lot about what Drama sounds like. So if you guys recommend it. I've added Drama to my SL now. Let's see when the god of prog kindly places a copy of it within my eyesight   :D

Btw, is your alias in the Room a tribute to Syd Barrett ?


I can't believe you have consigned Fragile, The Yes Album and Close to the edge into historical interest  >:(

OK, Iggy, maybe you can forgive me if I give'm a proper listen the next coupl'o days.


Methinks you need to watch the Symphonic Yes DVD

What's special about it, Iggy ?

I have the wonderful "House of Yes: Live from House of Blues" dvd, which I've watched many times.

Nicky.
« Last Edit: Tue, 2008-07-01, 00:08:35 by Nicky007 »
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Offline Iggy

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Re: Yes
« Reply #10 on: Fri, 2008-07-04, 11:47:19 »
OK, Andy, now I'm ready to hear Yes with another singer than Jon. I've actually wondered a lot about what Drama sounds like. So if you guys recommend it. I've added Drama to my SL now. Let's see when the god of prog kindly places a copy of it within my eyesight   :D

Btw, is your alias in the Room a tribute to Syd Barrett ?


OK, Iggy, maybe you can forgive me if I give'm a proper listen the next coupl'o days.


What's special about it, Iggy ?

I have the wonderful "House of Yes: Live from House of Blues" dvd, which I've watched many times.

Nicky.

The orchestra supporting the band were having a fantastic time and they played the Gates of Delirium which I had never heard live before.

The house of Yes is also a great DVD better than Keys to ascension (which should have been awesome but missed the mark a bit).

Live in Montreux is also worth a listen.

I still believe that Yes live is better than Yes in the studio as the early 'classic' albums were recorded when the technology was still being developed and suffers accordingly. (Genesis with PG  had the same issues imo)

We had an interesting programme on the BBC where several bands remade Sgt Peppers using the original equipment and it was interesting to see how they struggled.

Offline Steve Jones

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Re: Yes
« Reply #11 on: Sat, 2008-07-05, 09:36:37 »
better than Keys to ascension (which should have been awesome but missed the mark a bit).

Is that the one where the whole performance is ruined by sh*tty Top-of-the-Pops style special effects?  If so, that's the one I haven't played in a million years.  >:(
Regards, Steve Jones

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Offline Iggy

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Re: Yes
« Reply #12 on: Sat, 2008-07-05, 10:19:08 »
Is that the one where the whole performance is ruined by sh*tty Top-of-the-Pops style special effects?  If so, that's the one I haven't played in a million years.  >:(


Probably I play the CD's but not the DVD

On the CD I think That, That is on the 1st volume is a very under rated/ overlooked track everyone seemed to prefer Mind drive.

Offline Steve Jones

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Re: Yes
« Reply #13 on: Sat, 2008-07-05, 12:38:09 »
Probably I play the CD's but not the DVD
On the CD I think That, That is on the 1st volume is a very under rated/ overlooked track everyone seemed to prefer Mind drive.

I've just checked the DVD and it is indeed the one where the band are obscured by silly hippy effects for most of the gig.  Downer.  :(  On the plus side, it's in anamorphic 16:9 and upscales OK for HD tellys.  8)

Music wise, I love both 'Keys' volumes - live tracks and studio.  I even bought 'Keystudio' when it came out, so I could more easily listen to the new material.  Not something I'd probably bother doing now, in the age of the playlist.  :)
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Offline Iggy

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Re: Yes
« Reply #14 on: Sat, 2008-07-05, 12:49:05 »
I've just checked the DVD and it is indeed the one where the band are obscured by silly hippy effects for most of the gig.  Downer.  :(  On the plus side, it's in anamorphic 16:9 and upscales OK for HD tellys.  8)

Music wise, I love both 'Keys' volumes - live tracks and studio.  I even bought 'Keystudio' when it came out, so I could more easily listen to the new material.  Not something I'd probably bother doing now, in the age of the playlist.  :)


Indeed it is probably the only Yes CD I don't own.

Although when I built my Keys studio playlist I got them the wrong way round so it would probably sound strange.

I bought Abbey Road on tape when it first came out and when I purchased the CD the 1st songs on each side where swapped over it is amazing how different the album sounded.

Offline erik

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Re: Yes
« Reply #15 on: Thu, 2008-07-24, 12:49:17 »
As far as I know there's no Yes topic yet.
Since Yes is one of the great prog bands, I'd really like to know something about them.
It would be a shame to die and not having heard a Yes album. (Same goes for any of the prog dinos)

My questions to you:

1. Do you like Yes?
2. What's so good/bad about them?
3. What do they sound like? Give some info about them please.
4. Which studio albums are the best?
5. Which studio albums are the worst?

Just tell something about them. Anything you want.

-Paco

Aaah yes, a topic about Yes!  :P

1. Do you like Yes?

Absolutely! Have all their studio albums, Keys To Ascension 1 + 2 and the Symphonic Live DVD. Saw them live 4 times, every time they have played in Holland since I really discovered them, which was with Keys 1. Before that, during high school I lent Talk (1994) from the library, taped it and really came to like that album – still do.

2. What's so good/bad about them? 3. What do they sound like? Give some info about them please.

Yes has a long and illustrious career, really an unsurpassed prog soap opera  :P  In short: amazing musicians, virtuoso playing by all band members, great lead vocals and harmony vocals, epic songs that combine complex structures with great melodies, great live band and special mention for the awesome bass of Squire, just put on Long Distance Runaround or Roundabout for instance and focus on the bass only – spectacular!

4. Which studio albums are the best?

Their 100% perfect album is Close To The Edge, 3 songs all 3 great and classic, but for me it comes second to my personal favourite: Going For The One. I don’t really like the song Parallels on that one, but the rest is great and it has Awaken and Turn Of The Century on it – for me Yes doesn’t get better than that! All albums from their classic period are great, besides the two already mentioned also The Yes Album, Fragile (albeit with some filler in the individual contributions), Tales From Topographic Oceans (albeit a love it/hate it album) and Relayer. The first two albums, Yes and Time And A Word aren’t essential but the latter is worthwhile and enjoyable.

Drama then is Yes meets The Buggles and is a very good effort, an album with one foot in 70s prog and the other in 80s music, a successful mixture. Machine Messiah and Tempus Fugit are great tracks.

90125 is considered the best of the Rabin albums and a pop rock classic, but I prefer Talk, a better mixture of Rabin and classic Yes.

Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe is pretty good, almost the classic line up but with a modern, quite catchy sound. Don’t really like Bruford’s electronic drum kit though and the track Teakbois really should have been left off. ABWH and Rabin Yes then merge on Union, or “Onion” as Wakeman calls it, not their best but I think it’s a very enjoyable pop rock album with very catchy songs.

From their more recent period the best albums are Magnification (with orchestra, In The Presence Of, Dreamtime and Spirit Of Survival are highlights) and the "lost album" Keystudio (Mind Drive!!). The Ladder is also pretty good although a bit of a mixed bag.

5. Which studio albums are the worst?

Open Your Eyes is their low point, uninspired and bland and basically a Squire/Sherwood album. Also Tormato (has its moments but fails to captivate me) and Big Generator (although a fun pop rock album in its own right) are not their best efforts.

Apologies for my absence in the Room by the way, have been occupied but also become rather computer screen wary lately, staring at it a lot at work and then also in my spare time made me want to cut down on it… To quote a great Marillion track (Interior Lulu): “We stare at our screens / All our lives / What a waste of eyes”). Which is not meant to imply that the Room is a waste of time/eyes, quite the contrary!
« Last Edit: Sat, 2008-07-26, 16:08:07 by erik »
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Offline Proglady

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Re: Yes
« Reply #16 on: Thu, 2008-07-24, 13:32:15 »
I missed this bit Nicky

I can't believe you have consigned Fragile, The Yes Album and Close to the edge into historical interest  >:(

Methinks you need to watch the Symphonic Yes DVD

atb
Iggy

I think so too, a great DVD.  *horns*

Offline erik

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Re: Yes
« Reply #17 on: Thu, 2008-07-24, 17:29:47 »
The Yes story is still not ended by the way, this interesting news was overshadowed however by Jon Anderson's health problems and the subsequent cancellation of their American 40th anniversary tour. Let's hope he recovers well and Yes really gets kicking again.

Quote
Even as it prepares for its 40th anniversary tour this summer, Yes is working on new material, frontman Jon Anderson has revealed to Billboard.com.

Anderson says the progressive rock heroes are preparing four new songs of the "opus" variety -- lengthy, multi-movement compositions along the lines of "Close to the Edge" and "Tales From Topographic Oceans."

"They're very, very different," Anderson says. "It'll be interesting when we perform them, because we know that we want to try and perform them in a unique fashion."

But Anderson adds that he's not sure those songs will wind up comprising Yes' first set of new material since 2001's "Magnification."

"Putting together an album really isn't logical anymore," he notes. "Putting together a large piece of music or something that is really a jump in a musical direction takes a lot of commitment from everybody.... But maybe during the tour we will discuss making some new music."

Anderson says he'd also be amenable to some sort of reunion of the Yes lineup that made the group's triple-platinum 1983 smash "90125" as well as 1987's "Big Generator" and 1994's "Talk."

He and Trevor Rabin, the guitarist and co-producer in that incarnation of the band, have been in discussions about "maybe touring some of that '80s-period music, because it was very special."

But Anderson says he and Rabin aren't necessarily thinking about resurrecting that version of Yes as a recording entity.

"I wouldn't do it, like, Yes," Anderson explains. "I'd do it like me and Trevor aspiring to be the two of us making music and see what we come up with.

The Yes anniversary tour kicks off July 12 at the Festival d'ete de Quebec in Quebec City.
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Offline erik

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Re: Yes
« Reply #18 on: Sat, 2008-07-26, 14:54:25 »
As an afterthought: they really got the segue of the tracks all wrong on Close To The Edge and Relayer. Both albums start with the epic, i.e. the climax of the album and end with the track that would have made a good opening track. I guess in the vinyl days you could remedy this by putting on Side B first (although that doesn't solve the opening track thing). Now we can program our cd player to make these albums flow better:

Close To The Edge
1. Siberian Kathru
2. And You And I
3. Close To The Edge

Relayer
1. Sound Chaser
2. To Be Over
3. The Gates Of Delirium

They did get it right on other albums, such as Going For The One, opening with the punchy title track and closing with Awaken.
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Offline Nicky007

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Re: Yes
« Reply #19 on: Mon, 2008-07-28, 15:53:21 »
They did get it right on other albums, such as Going For The One, opening with the punchy title track and closing with Awaken.

That "punchy title track" (to say the least) simply floored me totally the first few times I heard it back in the late 70's. It was so overwhelming that I just couldnt come to grips with what I was hearing - like s* the first few times (apart from the hearing).

At that moment of creativity, Yes simply transcended all they had done before and after (which of course includes a lot of highs). There everything combined into one great rush.

When I hear or even think of that song, I'm reminded of the greatness of Yes  *horns* *horns* *horns*

You may think that I'm being a bit hyperbolic, but that's really the way I experienced it.

Nicky.
« Last Edit: Fri, 2009-10-30, 14:57:32 by Nicky007 »
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Offline Nicky007

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Re: Yes
« Reply #20 on: Fri, 2009-10-30, 15:02:45 »
Inspired by Aswas' recent post, here's some info about Yes 2004-09 from Wikipedia (Yes (band)):


Since 2004, Yes has been on hiatus. In lieu of releasing new albums, they formed deals with Image Entertainment and other video firms to release past concert performances, music videos, and interviews on DVD. Howe, Squire, Wakeman and White had all expressed an interest in recording and touring, but Anderson had been firmly opposed because of personal health concerns. Thus, band members have pursued varied solo projects. White has formed a new group, White, featuring Downes. Their debut album, also called White, was released on April 18, 2006. In 2004, Squire joined a reformed version of The Syn, one of his pre-Yes groups from the 1960s.

Plans for a joint tour by White, The Syn, and Steve Howe, which would have included the Yes members (with singer Kevin Currie from White) performing songs from Drama, were canceled. White joined the band for a tour in 2006. On May 16, 2006, Squire announced that he had left The Syn. On the same day, the original members of Asia, including Howe and Downes, announced that they would be reuniting for a 25th anniversary tour, which commenced in September. Anderson and Wakeman toured together in October 2006, and the set list for most shows featured Yes material along with songs from both their solo careers, and at least one ABWH song. In 2006, Sherwood, Kaye and White — along with guitarist Jimmy Haun — formed Circa, a supergroup formally announced in March 2007. On July 30, 2007, the band self-released on Internet their debut album, Circa 2007. Their debut live performance was held on August 23, 2007, at The Coach House in San Juan Capistrano, at which time the band performed its entire debut album followed by an hour-long medley of Yes songs.

Anderson has also composed some new music with Trevor Rabin. How this music will reach the public has yet to be seen.

In the first half of 2008, Anderson toured North America, Howe toured with Asia, and White toured with Circa.

In honour of the band's 40th Anniversary, Yes had announced a 2008 world tour, entitled Close to the Edge and Back. However, the tour was cancelled on June 4 due to Anderson's health problems. Per the press release, "Yes frontman and founding member Jon Anderson was admitted to the hospital last month after suffering a severe asthma attack. He has now been diagnosed with acute respiratory failure and was told by doctors this weekend that he needs to rest and not work for a period of at least six months or suffer further health complications. Upon receiving this news the band has determined that their tour plans need to be put on hold." The tour had been planned to feature Anderson, Squire, Howe, and White, and to also include Oliver Wakeman sitting in on keyboards, in lieu of his father, Rick (who bowed out on the advice of his doctors).

Anderson said the band was preparing four new "lengthy, multi-movement compositions" for the tour which are "very, very different," however, after the weak sales of 2001's Magnification, Anderson has said that "putting together an album really isn't logical anymore" and no announcement has been made as to a release of recordings of this new material in any form.

A separate, North American tour entitled "In The Present" began on November 4, 2008 in Ontario, Canada, featuring Howe, Squire & White, along with Oliver Wakeman on keyboards, and Canadian Benoît David on vocals. David was singing in progressive rock band Mystery and in a Yes tribute band called Close to the Edge. The shows were billed as "Howe, Squire and White of Yes," although many reports and outlets simply referred to the band as "Yes". The tour saw the return of material from the Drama album (Tempus Fugit and Machine Messiah), Astral Traveler from the Time and a word album (not played live since 1971), as well as one new Chris Squire composition, Aliens (Are Only Us From the Future).

In the official press release, Squire stated, "This isn't an attempt to replace Jon Anderson, because as we all know, that would be impossible. With Benoît, we are bringing in a talented singer so that we can go out and honour the music of Yes for the fans who have waited for the past four years to see us perform." Squire also stated to the Associated Press that he is hopeful Anderson will be well enough to do shows in 2009. Initially, Anderson stated on his website that he was "disappointed" and "disrespected" by the move and lack of contact the other members have had with him since his illness. Later, this announcement was removed from his website, and Squire has since said that the tour has Anderson's "blessings".

On February 9, 2009, Squire was rushed to a hospital with an unspecified "medical emergency" that required a operation on his leg on February 11, 2009. He required at least a month to recuperate, which resulted in the postponement of the remainder of the scheduled "In the Present" shows, mostly in the Western USA. After this incident, Howe returned to work with Asia.

Squire, Rabin, and White re-united at a benefit reception on 18 April 2009 in Snoqualmie, Washington, playing the music of John Lennon.

The tour resumed in the summer of 2009, with the same "In the Present" band, now simply billed as "Yes". This tour featured Asia as an opening act, with Steve Howe playing with both bands. The 24-date schedule began in Indio, California on June 26, and ended in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania on August 2. Meanwhile, Jon Anderson is doing a European solo tour.

Yes announced a European tour scheduled in fall and winter 2009 (from Olomouc, Czech Republic on October 29 up to Gothenburg, Sweden on December 12).

Squire announced plans for a new album after their European tour wrapped up.


Nicky.
« Last Edit: Sun, 2011-07-03, 10:43:48 by Nicky007 »
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Offline erik

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Re: Yes
« Reply #21 on: Fri, 2009-10-30, 16:01:00 »
Thanks Nicky, I'm going to see them live within two weeks, am really looking forward to hearing the Drama stuff live. They're keeping the flame alive. But of course I really hope Anderson recovers and we will see Yes in the glory line up again, Anderson has stated earlier that they were writing again and that the new material might be heading in epic directions..
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Offline Iggy

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Re: Yes
« Reply #22 on: Fri, 2009-10-30, 23:53:30 »
Thanks Nicky, I'm going to see them live within two weeks, am really looking forward to hearing the Drama stuff live. They're keeping the flame alive. But of course I really hope Anderson recovers and we will see Yes in the glory line up again, Anderson has stated earlier that they were writing again and that the new material might be heading in epic directions..

I'm going as well but on the 17th. I've seen them as a tribute band before when Geoff Downes and trevor Horne were filling in for Anderson and Wakeman.  :P

Offline Nicky007

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Re: Yes
« Reply #23 on: Sat, 2011-07-02, 16:47:30 »
Great news, guys:  New Yes studio album, Fly From Here, released July 4, 2011, with a beautiful cover painting by Roger Dean  *horns*

www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B004Y1USV2/ref=s9_newr_gw_ir03?pf_rd_m=A3P5ROKL5A1OLE&pf_rd_s=center-3&pf_rd_r=1FJM33S5PGJARV1TPVNA&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=467128473&pf_rd_i=468294

Whatta long link address  :o

OK, we (oldies) are gonna miss Jon and Rick, but instead we get Benoît David on vocals, who's gotten some rave reviews, and Geoff Downes on keys, who I expect everyone here knows.


Here's what The Soft Machine Operator (COVENTRY, WARWICKSHIRE United Kingdom) writes about it in his Amazon.co.uk review (edited by me):

Yes reunited with Geoff Downes and Trevor Horn was an interesting prospect, especially as I like the Drama album. In fact, Drama is the last Yes album I really liked. What came in between is patchy, with stabs at AOR Rock and bizarre albums (Talk, Open Your Eyes) that don't sound much like Yes. Horn is producing and writing this time round, with new chap Benoit David assuming the vocals. (He's been Yes's singer since 2008.)

What would be "Side 1" consists of a single piece (We Can Fly From Here) split up into pieces. It's based on a couple of songs Horn and Downes wrote for the Drama album, but were never recorded. After the Overture, we're into We Can Fly From Here, which is a nice, catchy song with enough twists and turns to keep it interesting. From here, we go through Sad Night At The Airfield, a mellow piece, before the Madman At The Screen thunders in with some rumbling, typical Squire bass. Steve Howe contributes Bumpy Ride, which harks back the seventies, before there's a reprise of the title track.

As a suite the pieces work well together, with themes revisited and changes of rhythm along the way. It harks back to the early seventies, but the transitions between the songs are not as fluid as, say, Close To The Edge. However, it's enjoyable and the 23 minutes fly by.

The "second side" is a bit more patchy ....

Overall, I thought Fly From Here was a return to form. Benoit David has some very big shoes to fill, and he does well excellently, without resorting to copying Anderson. For me, this is the best Yes album since Drama and I look forward to hearing more from the lineup!


If I, Nicky, may add my opinion to this, I'd say that "bizarre" fits well to Open Your Eyes, and "not Yes" in the sense that I don't feel that it lives up to Yes' high standards in general, while I regard Talk as very much a Yes album, in fact as a wonderful one. True, Talk, and for that matter 90125, are very different from their precursors, but isnt that fully in the vein of Yes ? - experimental and collective, inviting in new people when the oldies go on hiatus ?

Iac I think that I can say that for several of us Roomies - Iggy, Erik and me, for sure - Yes has filled a great part of our lives with endless joy and awe. Thanx to all of you who have contributed, cuz whether we cherish your particular contribution or not, we know that everyone involved has given it his/her utmost - that lies in the nature of Yes, and of true prog for that matter  8)


More here:  en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fly_from_Here

Whoa, real stoked !

Nicky.
« Last Edit: Sun, 2011-07-03, 11:03:21 by Nicky007 »
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Offline Nicky007

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Re: Yes
« Reply #24 on: Sat, 2011-07-02, 22:12:13 »
Methinks you need to watch the Symphonic Yes DVD

Reckon you must mean Symphonic Live. Just added it to my SL. Thx Iggy  :)


Btw what do you think of Open Your Eyes ?  That's the only Yes album that I don't like. I'v given it several runs, but it simply doesnt click. I only like Man In The Moon, which is fun and catchy.

This Amazon review by Jason M. Carzon (Bowie, Maryland, USA) actually makes sense to me:

This 1997 effort by proggo-giants Yes has got to be the most despised album they have released. Could it be the lack of direction, the absence of keyboard virtuoso Rick Wakeman, the stripped-down simpler aproach, the addition of new members Billy Sherwood and Igor Khoroshev, the lack of some mega-epic 20 minute rock symphony ala Close To The Edge, Jon's new-age cosmic jive lyrics ? The above characteristics only partly define this album.

Here's what happened: Yes were to release Keys To Ascension 2 as the next official album back in 1997. Workoholic Wakeman was reluctant to tour due to prior commitments. Since the tour was up in the air, the label decided to postpone the release of Keys as well. Rick then left. Itching to tour, and with new management, Yes decided to wash their hands of the whole Keys debacle and whip out a new album quickly to take on the road with them. And what quicker way than to raid the backlog of solo material Chris Squire was working on with longtime Yes associate Billy Sherwood. So what you have here mimics what happened with the 90125 album, in that it was a Trevor Rabin solo album which morphed into a Yes album. Kudos must be given to Yes for making good of a bad situation, and as lazy and slapped-together easy way out albums go, this isn't as bad as has been made out to be. It was a Squire/Sherwood Conspiracy album and the other members had to wedge their bits in, and it often shows. Problem is, two weeks before OYE was released, the old record company opportunistically released the retro-prog rock Keys To Ascension 2 to capitalise on the 1997 tour. The two albums released just weeks apart were like night and day: Keys being a blatant return to epic material of old - a new Relayer - and OYE being something like the complete opposite. Fans were confused.

In total contrast to the 6 to 20 minute prog-rock of Keys, OYE is a stripped-down affair. The material is simpler, quirkier, and the production is more powerful. Some say this album is 'pop', but unlike albums like 1983's 90125, the songs here aren't really that terribly accesible either as some claim. Too weird, no stand-out 'single' as such. If Keys was using Relayer or Going For The One as a launching pad, OYE draws its plans from not 90125 or any Trevor Rabin era album, but more so like the first album Yes (1969) or Time And A Word (1970). There is a Beatles-ish vibe and quirkiness here, and the emphasis here seems to be more on vocal harmonies than instrumental overkill. The addition of Billy Sherwood (keyboards and 2nd guitar) brings an urgency to Yes and a more guitar presence, but still there is a feel of a band in transition, and the album appears to be partly going in a new direction and partly going through the motions.

- www.amazon.com/Open-Your-Eyes-Yes/dp/B000005CG0/ref=sr_1_47?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1309637829&sr=1-47

Nicky.
« Last Edit: Sun, 2011-07-03, 10:41:29 by Nicky007 »
So you've come of age
And so you want to meet God
Sure you can
He's right here next to me